This is a password protected BNSF Website. It is solely intended for Community First Responders, our Hazmat Contractors and members of the BNSF Hazmat Team. If you are looking for general information about BNSF and how we handle hazardous materials, please visit the BNSF Rail Safety Website.

VISIT BNSF RAIL SAFETY SITE

The BNSF hazmat strategy is built on

An Unwavering Effort to Improve Safety Performance

Through sustained focus on safety improvement, an average of 99.97 percent of hazmat trips arrive without incident.

Strict procedures to minimize risk

No matter where our hazmat team is working, or who is in charge, we follow rigorous standard procedures to ensure safe operations across our network.

Incident Prevention

We are continuously strengthening our hazmat safety program through forward planning and risk mitigation in order to reduce the potential for a hazmat incident.

Intense Training

BNSF is committed to thoroughly train Community Responders, Hazmat Contractors and the BNSF Hazmat Team — in the classroom and online.

Preparedness

In the event of a hazmat incident, our team stands ready to respond. We are well trained, well equipped and have planned ahead.

A 165-year heritage of excellence

Celebrating our heritage and building on our success is one of BNSF’s shared values. We are proud of our 165-year history.

First responder resources

Additional Safety Resources

Operation Lifesaver and Railroad Crossing Locator tools are excellent resources
on railway and rail crossing safety.

Commodity flow request

If you are a local emergency responder, elected- or emergency-management official and need BNSF hazmat commodity flow reports for your emergency response planning, click below to request information about shipments in your community. These are available on a confidential basis and for security reasons are not offered to the general public.

Submit a request

ask rail

Askrail: if you are first at the scene

Community Responders who arrive first to the scene of a rail emergency and need critical information about the contents of a railcar can rely on the AskRail mobile application.

This mobile app provides immediate access to accurate, real-time data about each railcar on a train. This information can help emergency responders make informed decisions about how to respond to a rail emergency.

More about askrail

ABOUT BNSF

BNSF Railway devotes extensive resources to safely move and deliver products essential to our everyday lives, including hazardous materials. Our commitment is to transport freight safely and meet or exceed the expectations of our customers, partners, employees and the communities where we operate.

visit the bnsf website

News and updates

12:00 pm

2017 National TRANSCAER® Achievement Award

BNSF Railway received the 2017 National TRANSCAER® Achievement Award. This award is given in recognition of extraordinary achievement in support of the TRANSCAER® initiative that extends beyond the geographic boundaries of any one region. Congratulations BNSF Hazmat Team for your efforts and dedication ensuring first responders and communities are better prepared for a possible hazardous materials transportation incident.

12:00 pm

24 Hour Emergency Response with Derailment Scenario Training

During the week of October 16-18, 2017, BNSF held a 24 Hour Emergency Response with Derailment Scenario training course for municipal first responders and our BNSF emergency response contractors. This course focused on familiarization and responding to railroad hazmat emergencies, allowing participants to gain knowledge and experience working with the railroad, our emergency response contractors and municipal first responders on scene of a railroad emergency.

9:47 pm

BNSF began developing and testing a PTC system before the first Congressional mandate made in 2008. BNSF was the first and only freight railroad to operate PTC starting in 2012 and continues to be the leader in Class I railroad operations with PTC on freight lines. The industry-wide change is arguably one of the most significant changes for railroads – bigger even than the conversion from steam to diesel-powered locomotives.

READ MORE